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Business Writing

The amount of time wasted by poorly-executed emails is astounding. It’s not simply time wasted through misunderstanding but misallocation of words. The time cost and the distraction cost lead to an unfortunate business cost. Of course, we cannot control the reader, but we can control the writer.

“Writing is easy. All you have to do is cross out the wrong words.” —Mark Twain

“I only achieve simplicity with enormous effort.” —Clarice Lispector

When we put systems into place regarding our writing, we can influence our reader accordingly.

Focus

Business emails should not be written in a stream-of-consciousness style akin to a WhatsApp conversation. Your reader should not wonder if you are related to Benjy from The Sound and the Fury. Keep it simple. Before you write your email, ask yourself: What do I want to convey? What does my reader need to know?

Organization

This is the answer to “How.” How can I convey this to my reader? Again, keep it simple. You don’t need a cannon to shoot a rabbit.

Development

Sometimes we have a lot to say. Remember, though, that your long email will likely be processed in parts. And the notion that your entire email will be processed by the reader is optimistic. When you determine how extensively you need to develop your email (if it’s longer than two-three paragraphs), consider sending it in parts. (Don’t reveal your plan in the subject line, i.e., The Nestle Account, part 1.) Just set some reminders or alerts so that you know to initiate part 2, 3, etc., but do so after you’ve determined that part 1 was adequately comprehended and acted upon.

Logic

It’s not enough to proofread your email once before clicking “send.” Unfortunately, if it makes sense to you, that means very little to your reader. Many of us use inside lingo on the outside world, and then we are surprised that we’ve accidentally circumscribed our audience. Don’t proofread your email while asking, “Does this make sense to me?” Instead, proofread your email while asking, “Will this make sense to my reader?”

Arima Business Solutions has expert consultants in business writing, editing, blog writing, and ghostwriting. Reach out to us today. Let’s have a conversation about your content-creation needs.

0 comments on ““To Do” and “Not To Do” Lists”

“To Do” and “Not To Do” Lists

If you’ve been active on social media lately, you’ve likely scrolled upon an article showcasing Leonardo da Vinci’s “To Do” list. The implication is not simply that da Vinci’s list is more ambitious than yours but, specifically, that “To Do” lists are composed by successful people.

“History will be kind to me, for I intend to write it.” —Winston Churchill

“The question isn’t who is going to let me; it’s who’s going to stop me.” —Ayn Rand

While the “To Do” list has enjoyed great fanfare, the “Not To Do” list seems to be under-emphasized. What should make your “Not To Do” list may differ from others’, but consider these:

Smart Phones

When you need to focus on something, turn off your ringer (don’t allow it to vibrate either), and place your phone face down. Your focus is a hot commodity, and it should be protected. Of course, apps and telemarketers are competing for your focus. Do not surrender until you have planned to. In other words, when you are working, producing, thinking . . . when you are focused . . . build a fortress that phone notifications cannot penetrate. And then, once you are ready to switch tasks, once your focus is not at a premium, go ahead and flip your phone over, and have a look at your Facebook feed.

Carpe diem

To be clear, you should commit to seizing the day. What you should be careful of (on weekdays) is carpe noctem. This, of course, is a reference to seizing the night, and it is especially curious to see how we can arrive home after a long workday, and while we claim to be tired, we find ourselves suddenly possessed after a glass of wine (or two). We live in the moment, focused only on our immediate goal: “This feels good, so let’s fuel this feeling!!” Our less-immediate goals fall by the wayside, taking second place to a tired, tipsy, fun-loving fool. This may be why it’s not too crowded at the top. Remember, success is not an accident. If you have serious goals, then you must take them seriously.

Habit Changing

You have developed specific habits on purpose. You exercise each day for 45 minutes, or you include green veggies in each of your meals, or you kick-start your brain each morning by studying a foreign language. Maybe you meditate daily, or perhaps you make sure to read at least 5 pages from a self-help book every morning. Whatever your habits, know that when you skip a day, you are (often unconsciously) abandoning the habit and embracing a new one: the new habit, of course, is no longer doing whatever you were previously committed to. If you have deliberately chosen your habits, haphazard “habit changing” should make your “Not To Do” list.

What are some other things that should be on your “Not To Do” list? Comment below, or reach out to us today.

0 comments on “Remember “Think & Grow Rich””

Remember “Think & Grow Rich”

Any entrepreneur serious about his craft has likely read Napoleon Hill’s Think & Grow Rich. It’s been 80 years since its original publication, but the secrets offered to Hill by Andrew Carnegie remain transformative. Further, they remain fundamental to success. As Jim Rohn once said, “There are no new fundamentals. You’ve got to beware of the man who says ‘we’re manufacturing antiques.'”

“We see men who have accumulated great fortunes, but we often recognize only their triumph, overlooking the temporary defeats which they had to surmount before ‘arriving.'” —Napoleon Hill

“Defeat makes you stronger.” —Napoleon Hill

Here are 3 fundamentals from Hill’s essential work:

Thoughts Are Things

If your thoughts are buoyed by vague hope and imprecision, you will not likely transcend your place in life. If, however, you recognize that thoughts are real, then commit to making your thoughts clear and precise. This type of thinking is what Andrew Carnegie employed to turn desire into gold. He followed six steps, two of which shall be identified here:

  • First, write out a clear, concise statement of the amount of money you intend to acquire, name the time limit for its acquisition, state what you intend to give in return for the money, and describe clearly the plan through which you intend to accumulate it.
  • Second, read your written statement aloud twice daily, once just before retiring at night, and once after arising in the morning. As you read, see and feel and believe yourself already in possession of the money.

Failure

There are 31 major reasons for failure. Many of the reasons play critical roles in our story (the story we tell ourselves and often unconsciously rehearse). Among these 31 reasons noted by Hill is number 4: Insufficient education. Hill writes: “There is a handicap which may be overcome with comparative ease. Experience has proven that the best-educated people are often those who are known as ‘self-made’ or self-educated. It takes more than a college degree to make one a person of education. Any person who is educated is one who has learned to get whatever he wants in life without violating the rights of others. Education consists not so much of knowledge, but of knowledge effectively and persistently applied. Men are paid not merely for what they know, but more particularly for what they do with that which they know.”

Positive vs. Negative

Positive and negative emotions cannot occupy the mind at the same time. According to Hill, these are the major negative emotions: fear, jealousy, hatred, revenge, greed, superstition, anger. And these are the positive emotions: desire, faith, love, sex, enthusiasm, romance, hope. “It is your responsibility,” notes Hill, “to make sure that positive emotions constitute the dominating influence of your mind.”

A little bit of success literature can go a long way. Make the consumption of works like Napoleon Hill’s Think & Grow Rich a part of your daily ritual. As Zig Ziglar was fond of saying, “People often say that motivation doesn’t last. Well, neither does bathing—that’s why we recommend it daily.”

For more motivation, reach out to us today. Let’s have a conversation about your needs.